RSS

Tag Archives: DSD

Let the Work Begin!!!

Come Discover Scuba Diving

And so with certificate in hand the work begins to filter in, first up were a couple of DSD’s. DSD is a discover scuba diver, folks who are trying out diving for the very first time. They require an introduction, orientation of the equipment, complete 3 basic skills and usually the instructor holds onto them during the dive in some manner to control their buoyancy. This is an excellent opportunity for the instructor to instill the love of diving, to encourage the guests to continue to take the open water course and beyond. It is also an excellent opportunity for an instructor to scare the living daylights out of someone if they are not careful. Luckily that seldom happens.

Trying to get used to handling DSD’s is one of the great secrets, for some instructors they have the DSD link arms, or hold onto elbows, or the instructor holds the tank of the DSD and let’s them just enjoy while the instructor acts as a taxi driver… I prefer a variety of these, depending on the DSD themselves.

My first 2 DSD’s were French, so with the aid of Thomas, a Divemaster candidate, we were able to do the briefing and everything in a combination of French and English. I almost had them interested in doing their Scuba Diver Certification (just below Open Water Cert), but they decided they just wanted to go out and enjoy. They had been diving in Malta once before and were excellent students, in fact it was difficult to get them out of the water, especially after the second dive.

Great DSD's and an Awesome DMT

Great DSD’s and an Awesome DMT

My next DSD turned out to be more of a challenge. A wonderful lady from New Zealand, living in Phuket. 4 of her family were already divers and were taking their Advanced course, while another 2 were taking their Open Water course. So this was her entry into the world of Scuba Diving. During the orientation and the knowledge review she seemed calm and confident. Then I got her in the water and she was nervous but ok. When we got to the line there was a bit of wave, but we managed to get down a bit below the surface and begin the skills. We had to pop up once or twice as she was getting very nervous. It didn’t help that another instructor waiting for the line had his brand new divers too close and we both got nudged in the head by fins… luckily he was able to move them before anything more serious.

We headed down and stayed really shallow as she had issues equalizing. We only made it for 15minutes before she decided to end as we surfaced out came the regulator and she fed the fish… she felt so bad for doing throwing up, but I just kept swimming and told her not to worry, the fish were happy. She had really enjoyed it but just felt a little sea sick, which can easily happen. Back on the boat she fed the fish a few more times but was determined to try again. This time the dive was 16minutes and she did much better with equalizing and swimming and is now tempted to do her Open Water. A very educational morning for me.

Later on that week I had a request from another Dive School to take out a DSD from Israel. Dana was a sweetheart but her english was not perfect so we took a little extra time to explain everything. This must be one of the most entertaining DSD’s I have taken thus far, we were diving at Sail Rock and usually going around the rock and enjoying what you see should take you 20-30 minutes at least. We zipped around the rock 3 times in 31 minutes. It was like having my own little propulsion vehicle, I just held on and had her drive me round, a nice change from having to be the driver. She so badly wanted to go deeper but due to equalisation problems she was having I decided to keep her around 6 meters, which meant I had to keep pushing on her tank to stop her from pulling us down. The second dive she did much better so we were able to get a little deeper. Dana loved every minute of it and had excellent air consumption, in fact I started to think her air gauge wasn’t working or she wasn’t breathing. By the end of the day she was super excited and wanted to do her Open Water Class as well. A great day diving!!!

DSD Dana!!

DSD Dana!!

I truly love taking DSD’s and seeing the expression on their face when they discover the underwater world for the first time!

Tune-uos and Fun Dives

Other than DSD’s another section of divers that do not involve a few days of course work are the Tune-ups and the Fun Divers. Tune-ups are the ones who are certified but just not been in the water for a period of time and need a refresher. Fun Divers are just that, out to have fun, already certified and loving diving!

My first Tune-up was combined with a fun dive. The mum was getting a reminder and her 12yr old daughter was fun diving. The 12yr old was an absolute natural and her mom picked up the skills perfectly, although had some issues with buoyancy so I kept a hand on her tank just in case. The second dive was tremendous, both of them were phenomenal and at the end of the dive the mum said something that made my day:

“That was brilliant!! I have never felt so comfortable diving before in my life!!! Thank you so much I think I want to do my Advanced Class soon!!! Thank you again!!”

Great family of divers

Great family of divers

My most recent Fun Divers were a father and son. Another great day diving in fairly challenging conditions, there were some waves after the first dive but then a storm moved in, getting back onboard after the second dive was more akin to riding a bucking bronco in a rodeo, but we all survived and enjoyed the ride. The son had just passed his Open Water course and was doing his first fun dive, he was a little nervous but did fantastically, a few buoyancy issues on the second dive but he compensated very well. His Father on the other hand was a Divemaster who had logged hundreds of dives and had freediving fins that were almost the same height as me.

Now THOSE are FINS!!!

Now THOSE are FINS!!!

So all in a days work of being a Dive Instructor… can’t wait till the work week begins again!!!

 
5 Comments

Posted by on August 12, 2015 in Scuba Diving, Thailand, Travel

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Hula Hoops, Dive Burps and a Frog’s Leg…

Friends and Hula Hoops

Ari and James returned to Chaloklum to look into doing the DSD, Discover Scuba Diving, course. James was concerned that wounds inflicted during an accident involving falling off a roof and sliding down between 2 buildings might limit his chances or risk the attraction of a shark or two. Luckily the wounds had healed enough not to cause an issue. When asked how it happened he had absolutely no idea, we decided it must have been due to a stray monkey flinging coconuts and nothing to do with alcohol…

James in the banana hammock...

James in the banana hammock…

Unfortunately the weather had taken a turn for the worse. The monsoon had arrived, and I know I had said this before, but, at least for this week, it looked like it was back. After some discussion where we feared the weather might be horrific the following day, they both decided against doing the course. We joked that that meant the weather would be glorious…which of course it was.

We decided to grab some drinks and wait for Cucina Italiana to open for some hand made pasta. Ari and James started with wine and I opted for a variety of pineapple drinks (non alcoholic as I was still feeling under the weather). Then we discovered the hula hoops…

Ari was a natural!

Ari was a natural!

I surprised myself

I surprised myself

James realised how his lack of hips made it nigh impossible

James realised how his lack of hips made it nigh impossible

Dinner was delicious and then it was time to say farewell. I truly wanted to stay longer but I felt horrendous and had to dive in the morning. I wished this mystery illness that only inflicted me at night would disappear, more water that’s what I needed.

I am not sure when or even if I will ever see these two fabulous souls again, I hope we stay in touch and will miss them on all future adventures. Here’s to the next reunion guys, love ya tons!!

Dive Burps???

On days we go to Sail Rock we do two dives. The first one usually goes without incident and then we surface for an hour lunch. However, on the second dive I have discovered that, for some obscure reason, I often burp, and lunch doesn’t taste so good the second time around. I had even started perfecting the preventative actions required for if the second serving of lunch attempted to become more than a burp. When I did my first course it was drilled into us never to throw up into the regulator, it would be a B*#@h to clean. therefore I was ready and prepared:
~Create a seal with my tongue
~Remove regulator
~And feed the fish.
So far I hadn’t needed to use these skills, but you never knew when they may come in handy.

On this day I was helping Gem with her DSD. I practiced the float line and again made it too loose, but was definitely improving. As we descended on DIVE 1, I realised I was feeling a premature burp coming on. I didn’t even have anything other than some tea for breakfast. For the entire duration of BOTH dives it was like I was breathing burping gas. At one point Gem got hiccups, so here I was burping every few seconds and then she would hiccup. It was almost too funny to explain. As we neared the end of the 2nd dive, my skills were called into action as an almighty burp had me feeding the fishes, but only a little and no one saw, except a group of rabbit fish and a butterfly fish…

The final burp seemed to have knocked most of it out of me and just as well, as Gem had me practice the frog kick (meant to be for upper level divers to create a more stream line energy efficient kick). I had to practice by circling the DSD who was hanging onto the float line for our 3min safety stop at 5m. I would do a lap and look at Gem, who would shake her head. I would repeat the lap with the same result. After 3mins I had only succeeded in doing it correctly for half a lap. More practice was needed.

French Birthday, Frogs Beware!

One of my French neighbors, Philippe, was having a birthday party and had invited me and the rest of the French Quarter (of the 7 houses in the row, 4 were French). I stopped by 7-11 and picked up some drinks and wrapped up my last ferrero roche choc for him. There must have been close to 20 people and the food provided was phenomenal. I could not believe all the options and varieties, from Thai, to Western to French… very French. I had noticed a decided lack of frog sounds that night and when the plate of steaming garlic frog legs was put in front of me, I realised why…then threw up a little in my mouth. I have never had the desire or thought to eat a frog’s leg, I am not sure why as I know they are perfectly good forms of protein… but they LOOK like frog legs, I have the same feeling if the foot is still on the chicken leg… But we all know about peer pressure!
IMG_6312

It was great party and if it hadn’t been for my gurgling stomach and headache (hopefully not from the previous food item) I would have stayed much longer:

Pile o' crabs

Pile o’ crabs

Michael, he is French too

Michael, he is French too

Francky, he is French too

Francky, he is French too

Cesar (Brazil) and the birthday boy Philippe

Cesar (Brazil) and the birthday boy Philippe

French Parties and Frog's Legs will do this to a person!

French Parties and Frog’s Legs will do this to a person!

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Diving and Nets….

Diving With Marc

Finally, after a 5 day self-imposed exile from diving to get myself healthy, I signed up to dive again. It appeared as if arriving on a humid tropical island, followed by immediately starting my Divemaster training, still suffering jet lag and diving for 5-6 days in a row after a year of not diving, had taken it’s toll on me. Not to mention that after living in Eugene, Oregon, I had not seen the sun in years, we get it occasionally for a few months over what is supposed to be summer. Don’t get me wrong it’s beautiful there, but I always miss the tropical sun and beach like where I grew up in South Africa. But now I was prepared, I planned to make sure I drank enough water on the boat, that I stayed out of the sun as much as possible, and that I ate properly. It’s amazing how easy it is to forget the basics and then you suffer greatly.

I was paired with Marc, Divemaster of over 3yrs, he had a pair of open water divers doing a fun dive and a friend of the owner who was joining us. Bic, a Thai Graphic Designer, had been diving many times, but he was not certified, so I went along as his buddy.

Netted!

The weather was glorious as usual, although the visibility was not the best. I was thrilled to be back in the water, 5 days is way too long!

Me Descending The Line

Me Descending The Line

We saw a number of bull sharks and on the second dive we had one, around 3m, come really close to inspect us, from the angle I was at it almost looked as if Marc was going to tickle it’s nose when he reached out to dissuade it from coming closer. Call me crazy, but I wouldn’t reach any appendage out when a shark is nearby.

It might not be a Bull Shark, but it is a great pic of a "deadly" Rabbit Fish (feel free to insert Monty Python Jokes Here)

It might not be a Bull Shark, but it is a great pic of a “deadly” Rabbit Fish (feel free to insert Monty Python Jokes Here)

I had told Bic to stay close to me and well, he did just that, staying VERY close. It was all rather amusing, but he was a perfectly capable diver and it was a great day to dive.

Bic and Me

Bic and Me

The sad thing was seeing another fishing net that had been caught on the rocks and left there by local fisherman. Since Sail Rock is not a preserve, fishing is allowed and we fear that at night there are some rather intoxicated fishermen who misjudge locations and end up snagging rocks and pinnacles. Without the ability or drive to try remove them they simply cut the rope and drop the entire thing below the surface, trapping fish and causing untold damage.

Net

Net


Net on other side

Net on other side

In fact, it is believed that such an event a few months back, that had covered most of the rock below the surface, trapped thousands of fish and had taken the efforts of divers from both Koh Phangan and Koh Tao to remove, had attracted the now ever-present bull sharks back to Sail Rock. They arrived 3 days after the net had been removed and had not been seen in the area in over 7yrs… The only bonus being that it was almost a certainty to see them, hanging out in the murk layer of around 18m. So far there had been no incidents, and we all planned to keep it that way. Considering Bull Sharks (known as Zambezi’s in South Africa) are listed as the 2nd to 3rd most dangerous shark (depending on sources and just how big that Tiger Shark is that is gunning for the higher spot) in the world, let’s hope these are friendly??!??.

By the time we left the net was still there. But plans were in the works to organise a “Rock Rescue” Party to remove it. For the time being divers were cutting holes in the net to release fish trapped beneath it. It might seem easy to just cut and remove it, but trust me, it’s a lot more complicated and is just safer to organise a net recovery.

You Know You’re a Local When…

For dinner I decided to pop down the road to my local place. I really love their food there and the couple who run it are awesome. Also it is open air so you can enjoy the breeze. Tonight’s dinner was my usual favorite of Cashew Nut Chicken (sometimes with more cashews than chicken), the total was 70baht. Unfortunately I realised I only had 40baht on me, having forgotten to fill my wallet. But the owner was not stressed and said “just pay rest next time”. He had no fear that I would return… Yup I am a local..ish!

Diving With Gem

The next day I was paired with Gem, the Thai instructor. She had a couple of DSD’s (Discover Scuba – first time divers) and needed me to come along to set the float line and be there if needed.

It has also become my task to do the boat briefing, something I rather enjoy and am rather good at. It all came about when Marc said, “you like to talk! Up you get and do the boat briefing”. I have even had some other shop instructors on the boat comment how well I did. And it is true, I do like to talk…

The first dive went off fairly well, my float line was a little loose but as we descended I went down to tighten it. The 2 DSD’s completed their skills without too much trouble and were actually very comfortable in the water. Other than a bit of current the dive was very pleasant. Unfortunately, the net was still draped over the rock.

One of the weirdest sensations when surfacing is when you are suddenly faced with about 5 times as many boats at the rock compared to when you descended. It’s a little disconcerting as you try wrap your head around which boat is yours. On this particular day we descended the 1st dive with 2 boats, when we surfaced after 45min there were over 10!! Most of them were boats from Koh Tao island, they usually get there a little after us as it takes almost 2hrs to get to the rock, vs our 45min from Koh Phangan. The reason for so many is that divers had rallied to remove the net, and all the shops that didn’t have clients and even some that did had organised to remove it.

They did a great job too, ’cause when we descended for the 2nd dive they had all but removed the entire thing, and it was a very large section of net. However, there was one little piece being carried off by a crab, Gem spent a good 10min having a tug of war with it and finally won. You could almost hear it grumble off and see the frown (if crabs frown). A great day of diving and returning knowing the net had been removed made everyone breathe a sigh of relief.

Meeting Strangers

At my local place for dinner, indulging in my 2nd favorite dish of garlic pepper pork and rice, I met a girl from the US who had just arrived on the island and was planning on studying yoga here and in India. We chatted a lot about travel and she asked me a lot of questions about traveling by myself and where I had been. She seemed amazed that I had been, seen, and explored so many places alone… the strange thing is, it just feels normal to me, or maybe I just don’t know any other way to travel through life! One thing I know, is that one of my favorite parts of travel is getting to meet new and interesting people, especially those just starting out on the road and willing to learn.

Couchsurfers…round 2

Back at home I passed out utterly exhausted, setting my alarm for 8pm as there was a farewell for Kla, Thai divemaster, who was moving to Phuket for the next dive season. I also had 2 couchsurfers arriving at some point, but ferry delays and mishaps had pushed their time later and later. At one point they felt so bad they offered to find a place near the ferry terminal. I told them not to worry as I would be up any way at the Omega bar for the farewell.

Being the Schmidt I am, I arrived on time which meant no one else was really there yet. But Kla was and was practicing his guitar. So I grabbed a drink and hung out with the few there. At 9pm a text came through that my cs’ers had reached the ferry and were taxi bound. Saying farewell to Kla, I jumped on my bike and putted back towards home, stopping at the dive shop, the designated meeting point. When the taxi pulled up I had them follow me to my road and then had the boys jump out and walk the last few yards.

Willy was from Italy and Daniel from Austria, but they bothed lived in the same town in Austria and worked in the similar field of music and movies. I could tell they were going to be great fun to have around, super chill and always up for a laugh. The local was closed so I whipped up some of my favorite green curry ramen for them and what ever fruit I had left. Then Willy passed out in the hammock, Daniel on a few cushions on the floor and me in bed.

Green Curry Ramen!!!

Green Curry Ramen!!!

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 8, 2013 in Thailand, Travel, Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: